If you are currently facing criminal charges in the State of Florida you are undoubtedly concerned about the outcome of your case. Getting your charges dismissed or being acquitted of all charges is clearly the preferred outcome. Sometimes, however, the evidence is incontrovertible and no realistic defense is available. When that is the case it is often best to shift the focus to sentencing. That may lead you to ask “ Can I get house arrest in Florida? ” Because of the unique nature of a criminal prosecution the only way to answer that question about your own case is to consult with an experienced Florida criminal defense attorney. It may, however, be helpful to understand house arrest and other community corrections options better in the event you are ultimately sentenced to house arrest.

Conviction of a criminal offense can occur as a result of a plea agreement between you and the State of Florida or as a result of a guilty verdict at trial. If you enter into a plea agreement with the state your defense attorney will negotiate with the prosecutor to get you the most favorable sentence possible before you sign the agreement. All aspects of your sentence may be determined ahead of time or the judge may have discretion with regard to your sentence. If you are convicted at trial your sentence will be determined by the judge.

House arrest is a community corrections option. “Community corrections” means that you will serve all, or part, of your sentence out in the community instead of in jail or prison. House arrest requires you to remain at home unless you are at work, school, or other pre-arranged and scheduled places or appointments. Often, house arrest also includes electronic GPS monitoring that requires you to wear an ankle bracelet that is capable of transmitting your location 24 hours a day seven days a week.

Whether or not you will be allowed to serve your sentence on house arrest instead of in prison will depend on a number of factors, including, but not limited to:

  • The severity of the crime
  • Your criminal history
  • Whether the crime was a crime of violence
  • The length of your sentence
  • Past success/failure on community corrections
  • Whether you have a job or are enrolled in school
  • Your financial ability to pay the costs associated with house arrest

If you been charged with a criminal offense in the State of Florida it is imperative that you consult with an experienced Florida criminal defense attorney as soon as possible to discuss your legal options and get started on your defense. Contact the defense team at Powers, Sellers, & Finkelstein PLC by calling 727-531-2926 today to schedule your appointment.